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investment planning

Which Type of Investor Are You?

Many investors are very focused on annual returns and others worry about losing money if the economy goes into a recession. The reality is that how to approach or react to different scenarios really depends on what type of investor you are. In other words, context and your financial plan are everything!

Healthy, Wealthy and Wise

According to the Financial Consumer Agency of Canada1, good health is determined by mental, physical, and financial wellness. In other words: mind, body, and money. Physical and mental health makes sense, but what is financial wellness?

Financial wellness doesn’t necessarily mean you have millions of dollars invested, although you’ve achieved an admirable goal if you do. While it’s not about the balance in your savings account, financial wellness means you’re feeling good about the relationship you have with money, including:

Financial Advice for New and Expecting Parents

Whether you're expecting a child, planning to have one soon or have just become a new parent, you're about to embark on one of the most rewarding journeys that life has to offer. It's also one of the most expensive: an average of $12,500 per year until age 18.1. That's $225,000 per child, and it doesn't include the cost of post-secondary education. Planning for this is one way to be the best parent you can be.

A Point In Time

There are moments in time when significant economic shifts occur that alter the future. One such moment occurred in late August 2019 at the close of the Jackson Hole Economic Symposium. This is an annual and exclusive central banking conference to foster open discussion about important and current policy matters.

What's Your Investing Personality?

Just as each of us is unique as a person, we also have a distinct investing personality. One isn't better or worse than the other, but understanding "who” you are as an investor is helpful, no matter your circumstances, or how much money you have to invest. While it's a complex matter that depends on various factors, exploring the questions below may give you some preliminary insight into your investing personality.

Questions. Questions. Questions.

It is increasingly difficult to ignore some of the trading action in the markets that is causing surprising moves in equity values while the underlying economy continues to struggle (refer to U.S. unemployment data, for example). This type of divergence has occurred in the past and at some point, the values reflected in the stock, bond and real estate markets are expected to closely reflect the underlying economy eventually.

Time-Tested Money Management Strategies

As we grow up, what we learn about money from our parents can significantly influence how we earn, save, and grow our wealth. Meaghan, an elementary school teacher, credits her mother for her healthy approach to finances today. "I was lucky to grow up understanding that I could control my financial future if I was smart about it." There's a lot to be learned from a generation that knew how to manage their finances and feel optimistic about the future. Consider these time-tested principles that you can use to enhance your relationship with money.

Does Buy and Hold Still Work?

As an investment strategy, "Buy and Hold" is just what it sounds like: you buy an investment and hold it for an extended period, riding out market fluctuations and selling when the price reaches your target. The underlying logic of this strategy is that investments tend to gain value over time. That long-term gain, along with compound interest, can work to increase your initial deposit and provide you with a valuable asset for your future.

Is Inflation Missing?

Many commentators are expecting increased inflation in the coming months as Central Banks globally have ramped up their money creation efforts in response to the increased market volatility last March. There are different types of inflation, but most people have experienced price inflation, whereby excess demand is met by rising prices. The next round of anticipated inflation could be different than what most people are familiar with.

A State of Financial Wellness

Money has long been the number one stressor for many Canadians, and there's no doubt that COVID has magnified this reality. It has upended jobs, security, health and financial stability for people across the country. Millions of Canadians are struggling to cover their bills. In March of 2020, 49% of Canadians were just $200 from financial insolvency1.

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